US Detainee Transfers: What Responsibilities Does the US Have When Presented with the Risk of Torture in Afghan Prisons?

As recently reported by Mike Yang Zhang,[1] a United Nations report released on January 20, 2013 revealed “systematic torture” in many Afghan-controlled detention facilities.[2] Shortly after the U.N. report was released, a delegation was assigned by President Karzai to investigate the allegations of torture.[3] After a two-week investigation, the government panel “acknowledged widespread torture of detainees.”[4] The U.N. report proposed recommendations for eliminating these instances of torture, not only to the government of Afghanistan, but also to “Troop Contributing Countries.”[5] <Read More>


When Are Afghan Detainees Captured After March 9, 2012 Being Transferred? Part II

Part II- The U.S. Point of View and Multiple Interpretations of the MoU

In Part I, I discussed the signing of the MoU and the response of Afghan officials to the issue of detainees captured after March 9, 2012. Now, let us turn to the position of U.S. and allied officials.  The fact is that the U.S. continues to “process a steady stream of prisoners caught in night raids,”[1] and the U.S. <Read More>


When Are Afghan Detainees Captured After March 9, 2012 Being Transferred? Part I

When Are Afghan Detainees Captured After March 9, 2012 Being Transferred?

This two-part report will focus on Afghan detainees who have been captured and held in U.S. custody after the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding, and have yet to be transferred to Afghan control. Part I will provide some contextual information, as well as the various views of Afghan officials. Part II will focus on U.S. and allied <Read More>


Unconfirmed Sites

(updated December 31, 2012 by Byron Zinonos)

As previously mentioned,[1] on January 22, 2009, President Barack Obama issued an executive order stripping the CIA of its authority to detain prisoners in secret prisons.[2] On September 11, 2012, armed men assaulted the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, killing four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens.[3] Some “early accounts” originally stated that “the attack stemmed from a spontaneous protest”[4] or that the attack was “a terrorist act, perpetrated by people either associated with <Read More>