Bagram: Who is Still Being Detained?

“After a while I lost all hope that I would ever leave Bagram. I accepted that I would never be free.”

Jibran, ex-detainee from Bagram[1]                              

This statement reflects the longstanding problems with the indefinite detention at Bagram. In the immediate aftermath of the September 11th attacks, many individuals were captured by US forces to obtain information and restore the nation’s security. Today, there are over 50 people detained by the United States at Bagram with no release date in sight. The <Read More>


Three interviews with lawyers who have litigated detention cases

In the spring 2013 semester, students from the “Detention in the War Against Terrorism” class interviewed three lawyers who have worked actively on detention issues. We thank all three for agreeing to talk with us, and we hope readers of this site will find the interviews as illuminating as we did. They are:

Tina Foster, founder of the International Justice Network, who spoke with Michael Villacres; the video recording of this interview is available at http://nyls.adobeconnect.com/p26qnxhe0y4/.

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US Detainee Transfers: What Responsibilities Does the US Have When Presented with the Risk of Torture in Afghan Prisons?

As recently reported by Mike Yang Zhang,[1] a United Nations report released on January 20, 2013 revealed “systematic torture” in many Afghan-controlled detention facilities.[2] Shortly after the U.N. report was released, a delegation was assigned by President Karzai to investigate the allegations of torture.[3] After a two-week investigation, the government panel “acknowledged widespread torture of detainees.”[4] The U.N. report proposed recommendations for eliminating these instances of torture, not only to the government of Afghanistan, but also to “Troop Contributing Countries.”[5] <Read More>


Immunity for U.S. Troops and Detention in Afghanistan

The ongoing negotiations between the United States and Afghanistan regarding the future U.S. military presence in Afghanistan revolve around the crucial issue of immunity of American soldiers from prosecution.[1] The issue of immunity actually stems back directly to the March 2012 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU),[2] an agreement that required the United States to transfer its Afghan detainees to the control of the government of Afghanistan.

The issue of immunity has been historically important to the U.S. military. Traditionally, the U.S. negotiates <Read More>